The McNulty Scholar

The McNulty Scholars program is a collegiate scholarship for women in math and science. The McNulty Scholars Program at St. Joseph's University. You can also find out about the program on our About page, or find out How to Apply.

twitter.com/mcnultyscholars:

    2020:

Intel invests in “personal robot” future.
Intel’s personal futurist: “I love robots.”

    2020:

    Intel invests in “personal robot” future.

    Intel’s personal futurist: “I love robots.”

    — 2 years ago with 2 notes
    #robots 
    The brain has it’s own immune system?

    Everyone knows the brain is a rather vital part of your anatomy, however it’s thought of as a rather different and special organ. It’s cased in its own hard bone shell, has an elaborate blood-brain barrier to keep foreign chemicals out, and has no pain or sensory nerves. However beyond these protections that keep it humming under tough circumstances, there is now evidence that it has it’s own brand of the rest of the body’s immune system.

    From Science Daily:

    "In 2008, researchers at Rockefeller University first identified a population of dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, that was native to the brain. Now they have shown that these cells are not likely sleeping on the job. In experiments published recently in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and Brain Behavior and Immunity, the researchers show that these brain dendritic cells can muster the immune system’s soldier T cells when confronted by certain threats. They also show that, unlike dendritic cells from elsewhere in the body, brain dendritic cells line up along the periphery of stroke-damaged brain tissue, perhaps as a barricade protecting the healthy cells outside…

    Dendritic cells capture and process foreign substances called antigens before presenting them to T cells, which multiply and attack the invaders. To test their activity in the brain, the researchers, led by Rockefeller graduate Andres Gottfried-Blackmore, now a student at Weill Cornell Medical College, injected a mouse brain with interferon-γ, an immune-response molecule produced during specific inflammatory responses. They found that the interferon increased the number of brain dendritic cells without recruiting dendritic cells from elsewhere in the immune system. They then exposed the dendritic cells to a model antigen called OVA, prompting a proliferation of OVA-specific T cells. The brain dendritic cells also proved far more effective at stimulating T cell proliferation in the same test than similar immune-related cells called microglia, which reside in the brain in huge numbers. The difference suggests a specialized role for brain dendritic cells.

    In other experiments, led by postdoctoral fellow Jennifer Felger and in collaboration with the laboratory of Costatino Iadecola at Weill Cornell, researchers studied the response of brain dendritic cells labeled with a fluorescent protein after inducing strokes in mice. Unlike dendritic cells from elsewhere in the body, which were drawn into the stroke-damaged tissues, brain dendritic cells closed ranks around the perimeter of the damage, forming a barrier between stricken and healthy tissues.

    Brain dendritic cells remain largely mysterious, but their immune-related activity suggests they play an important part in protecting the brain. The researchers are also interested in finding out what they do when they are not battling threats such as strokes or infections. “It is equally important to understand what they do when they are not defending the brain,” Bulloch says.”

    — 4 years ago
    #brain  #health  #neuroscience  #research  #news 
    Scientific American: Humans Faced Extinction

    The good folks over at Scientific American wrote about recent evidence showing that about a million years ago, human populations had dwindled due to competition, pre-agricultural population limits and perhaps an environmental event like a supervolcano or other near-extinction-level extent. About a million years ago, and perhaps at other times during our history, our population fell to a hard floor of about 18,500 individuals, and a max of about 55,000. By examining the genes of disparate modern populations of humans, scientists were able to measure the progress of a particularly old part of our genome. Now it being very old it’s had a lot of time to build up mutations, and the difference between various populations should show how long at maximum the genes have been mutating separately. By the way, however, modern humans have far less genetic variation than that earlier, tinier population. After all, we’re the humans who have been selected out of dozens of these population pressures, so each time the bottlenecks left less variation.

    Oh no! Ice Age 3!

    They can explain it much clearer than I can, here, in any case it’s useful to remember that humans at one time, too, were rare and not guaranteed to succeed, and that we operate under the same macroenvironmental pressures as everyone else.

    — 4 years ago
    Exoplanets everywhere

    "Using the Very Large Telescope in the Chilean desert, astronomers were able to see the infrared spectrum of the exoplanet HR 8799c, 129 light-years away from Earth. Though this planet is a gaseous planet larger than Jupiter and not habitable, scientists could use the same technique to find the telltale atmospheric signals of gases like water vapor and nitrogen on Earth-like planets by measuring variations in the color of the planet’s light.”The composition of the atmosphere can be determined by the light reflected off the planet.

    Scientists have recently taken the first direct observation of the atmosphere of a nearby exoplanet. This marks an “encouraging benchmark” in the ability to observe these bodies for the signs of habitable elements and conditions. Which is just in time as improving telescopes and observation techniques have led to a rash of exoplanet discoveries in the last very few years.


    Read More http://ww.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/01/direct-spectrum-exoplanet/#ixzz0dDxGnfkj

    See Also:

    blatant credit to Wired.

    — 4 years ago
    Chromoscope →

    Far-Infrared view of universe from IRAS

    Chromoscope lets you see full-spectrum views of the visible universe, like this far-IR spectrum.

    — 4 years ago
    bmdesign:

An iceberg nearly twice the size of Hong Kong island is drifting towards Australia. It is currently 1700 kilometers south of the continent and was discovered on satellite images.

    bmdesign:

    An iceberg nearly twice the size of Hong Kong island is drifting towards Australia. It is currently 1700 kilometers south of the continent and was discovered on satellite images.

    — 4 years ago with 2 notes
    pocketmonsterd:

The Evolution of Storage on GOOD via lookbothways

Oh, that silly singularity keeps getting closer and closer.

    pocketmonsterd:

    The Evolution of Storage on GOOD via lookbothways

    Oh, that silly singularity keeps getting closer and closer.

    — 4 years ago with 16 notes

    data-rush:

    scientists at stanford university in california reported they have successfully turned paper coated with ink made of silver and carbon nanomaterials into a ‘paper battery’ that holds promise for new types of lightweight, high-performance energy storage.

    This is awesome, just think about paper-thin lighting and computing surfaces, wall paper that can store electricity for your house when prices are low, and reduce grid demand at peak hours.

    — 4 years ago with 2 notes
    About The Program

    The John P. McNulty Scholars Program is an innovative program that seeks to inspire young women to strive for leadership roles in science and math. The John P. McNulty Scholars Program for Excellence in Science and Math not only provides full-tuition scholarships but seeks to create a challenging environment designed to help bright young women reach the top ranks of science and math professions.

    The McNulty Scholars Program is seeking young women who dare to be the best. Named for John McNulty, a ’74 Saint Joseph’s alumnus, who is remembered for his service and leadership, first as Student Council President and later as a Board Trustee of the University, the scholarship embodies John’s constant pursuit of excellence and commitment to women’s achievements. Throughout John’s life, he consistently sought to mentor younger associates and to challenge women to achieve their fullest potential. By combining mentorship, summer research opportunities, professional internships, a senior capstone experience, networking and professional development, this program prepares the McNulty Scholars to meet the challenges of these highly competitive fields.

    Scholarship Value

    McNulty Scholars receive a complete scholarship that covers tuition and fees for four academic years, provided they meet all requirements for academic achievement and program participation.

    Program Elements The McNulty Scholars Program is designed as a dynamic, multi-faceted experience that supports young women’s academic and professional development. There are five major components to the John P. McNulty Scholars Program:

    • Mentoring: Each McNulty Scholar will be mentored regularly by a faculty member within her major field of study and will have the opportunity to enroll in professional associations and to attend scholarly conferences associated with her academic discipline. In turn, each McNulty Scholar will be required to participate in peer mentoring activities on a regular basis each semester and will serve as a peer mentor to future McNulty Scholars.


    • Summer Scholars: After completion of the first year, McNulty Scholars will be given an opportunity to participate in the Saint Joseph’s University Summer Scholars Program. Summer Scholars are provided financial support to engage in faculty-mentored research during a ten-week period in the summer months that aims to culminate in a research presentation or publication. McNulty Scholars will automatically receive one summer’s support through this program and then will be eligible to apply for support in subsequent years through the university-wide competitive application process.


    • Professional Internships: During the summers following the sophomore and junior years, McNulty Scholars may also choose to participate in professional internships in a field related to their major. The Career Development Center, the McNulty Program Coordinator, and the McNulty Scholars faculty mentors will help to identify appropriate internships, especially those that provide extensive interaction with established female professionals, and exposure to the realities of work within the field.


    • Senior Capstone Experience: Each McNulty Scholar will be required, during her senior year, to engage in a year-long basic or applied research project under the supervision of a faculty mentor for academic credit.


    • Networking and Professional Development: The University will organize semi-annual events that bring prominent alumni/ae and friends from science, mathematics and technology careers to campus. McNulty Scholars in their Junior and Senior years will be given first opportunity to attend pre-event receptions or discussions and will be invited to help select and organize events as upper-class women. McNulty Scholars will be offered tailored guidance in developing and marketing their resumes and polishing their interview skills to prepare them to pursue opportunities in higher education and careers in math and science.
    — 4 years ago